Dedicated Team of Personal Injury Lawyers Serving Auburn, WA

Located about 30 miles south of Seattle and just north of the Muckleshoot Indian Reservation, the 80,000 residents of Auburn, Washington live in parts of both King County and Pierce County. With the White River/Green River confluence nearby and the Cascade Mountains in the distance, the Auburn area offers plenty of attractions for the outdoor enthusiast, including 28 parks and 23 miles of hiking trails. Although the downtown area is known for its small-town charm, even while there tourists and locals can enjoy the 120-acre Auburn Environmental Park.

Auburn is well-served with modern transportation systems including the Auburn Municipal Airport, the Valley Freeway, Washington State Route 18, King County Metro buses, and the Auburn Station Transit Center (a commuter rail service that separates Auburn from Seattle and Tacoma by only a few minutes). Unfortunately, this kind of convenience carries with it the risk of accidents. Accidents that can trigger legal liability include, among others:

A serious accident is a shocking and traumatic event, especially when someone is killed. The sad reality is that in addition to dealing with physical trauma and emotional distress, you will also have financial matters to deal with. At Brett McCandlis Brown, we make it our business to help you through this difficult time by taking these matters into our hands and making sure that you receive all of the compensation that Washington law entitles you to. Once you retain us, we will take care of your financial problems while you concentrate on recovering physically and emotionally.

Frequently Asked Questions

What kinds of questions might I be asked during a deposition?

A deposition is a Q&A session in which the opposing lawyer questions you under oath. The questions might range from the seemingly trivial to the critically important. Examples include:

  • What is your work history?
  • How has your injury affected your daily life?
  • Exactly what time of day did the accident occur?
  • Have you ever been a party to a lawsuit before?
  • Did you file an insurance claim?

Some of these questions will be trick questions designed to elicit answers that the lawyer intends to use against you in court. Don’t worry, our injury attorneys will be by your side the entire time, and we will make sure that you don’t fall for any tricks.

What happens if I miss the statute of limitations deadline?

The statute of limitations deadline is a deadline for filing a lawsuit over a claim. Once you file the lawsuit (you turn in the required paperwork along with the filing fee, and the court accepts your filing after finding that your papers are in order), you have beaten the statute of limitations, no matter how long it takes to ultimately resolve your claim.

In Washington, the statute of limitations is three years after the claim arises. In a personal injury lawsuit, a claim generally arises on the date of your injury, while in a wrongful death lawsuit, the claim arises on the date when the victim dies. One important exception applies – the three-year period for a personal injury claim begins running on the date when your injury was discovered (or should have been discovered) if your injury was of the sort that would not be easy to discover immediately – a defective drug damaged your liver without your immediate knowledge, for example.

If you miss the statute of limitations deadline, your claim will be dead – you cannot even settle it out of court.

Who can I sue?

In a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit, it is possible to sue more than one defendant under certain circumstances. It won’t do you much good to sue an indigent defendant with no insurance because even if you win, the defendant will not be able to pay a judgment. Fortunately, under certain circumstances, an alternative defendant is likely to possess the financial means to pay a judgment.

If, for example, the defendant was an on-duty employee at the time of the accident – a UPS driver or, perhaps, a commercial trucker – you can sue the employer for the full amount of your damages. If your damages were caused by a defective product, under certain circumstances you can sue anyone in the chain of distribution of the product all the way from the manufacturer to the retailer. Other “deep pockets” defendants might be appropriate targets for a lawsuit, depending on the facts of your case.

Call our Auburn, Washington Injury Attorneys Today!

Our Auburn injury lawyers are willing to work with you on a “no win, no pay” basis – we don’t get paid until you do. Call us today at 1-800-925-1875 or complete our online contact form to schedule your free initial consultation, so that we can discuss your case and advise you of your options.