Injury Attorneys You can Trust Serving Longview and the Surrounding Areas

Longview, Washington sits on the edge of Cowlitz County at the junction of the Cowlitz River and the Columbia River. Fortunately, its population of 37,000 is enough to rescue it from the doldrums of small-town life while avoiding the traffic, crime, and urban blight that are so common in big cities.

Longview residents celebrate their local heritage through activities such as the Squirrel Fest summer festival (which began with the construction of the town’s unique Nutty Narrows squirrel bridge on Olympia Way), the Longview Grand Prix Criterium bicycle race, and regular performances at the Stageworks Northwest Theatre. With all of this, it is easy to forget that Longview is no more immune than any other place is to hidden dangers that can strike without warning.

Longview is geographically connected to the rest of the country through SR 4, SR 432, and the Lewis and Clark Bridge (a.k.a. the Longview Bridge) across the Columbia River. Unfortunately, State Route 4 and State Route 432 have a tendency to become congested with high-speed traffic during certain periods, and the asphalt can be an unforgiving place to try to steer your way out of a dangerous traffic situation. When a serious accident happens in Longview, it is usually an auto accident, although many other types of activities can pose equivalent risks.

Getting Help When Disaster Strikes

At Brett McCandlis Brown, PLLC, our personal injury and wrongful death lawyers have helped hundreds of clients facing the difficult and trying times that you are currently experiencing. Personal injury law is not just our job, it is our mission – we absolutely will not allow you to be taken advantage of by streetwise insurance claims adjusters or anyone else responsible for your loss. Contact us today at 1-800-925-1875 or fill out our online contact form for your free consultation.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What are “loss of consortium” damages?

Loss of consortium is typically used as an element of damages in personal injury and wrongful death cases when there is a particularly close relationship between the victim and the plaintiff, such as a spousal or parent-child relationship. In a marital context, it most often refers to the loss of sexual intimacy by the plaintiff when a spouse is killed or seriously injured. In a parent-child relationship, loss of consortium generally refers to loss of love and companionship by either the parent or the child (depending on who the plaintiff is). Loss of consortium claims are particularly difficult to settle out of court.

Should I settle my claim out of court or file a lawsuit?

The vast majority of personal injury and wrongful death claims are settled out of court. The reasons for this are that: (i) trials can be expensive; and (ii) courts, especially juries, can be highly unpredictable. Nevertheless, it is often necessary for a plaintiff to file a lawsuit simply to push the defendant (typically an insurance company) to offer a reasonable settlement. Just because a lawsuit has been filed doesn’t mean that the claim will be resolved by a court – the parties can settle at any time, even five minutes before a verdict is reached.

Can I sue an automobile manufacturer over a car accident?

Yes you can, if you can produce evidence that the accident was the fault of the automobile manufacturer due to a defect in the car. You can also sue the manufacturer of an auto part. If you rely on a theory of strict product liability, under certain circumstances, you can sue anyone in the chain of distribution of the defective automobile. You might be able to sue a parts distributor, for example, for a manufacturing defect even though the distributor did not manufacture the part.

What can I do if the other driver was uninsured?

Washington is a “fault” auto insurance state, meaning that the at-fault driver’s insurance company is liable for any auto accident damages caused by that driver. Washington drivers are required by law to carry liability insurance with coverage limits of no less than $25,000 per injured driver, $50,000 in injuries per accident, and $10,000 for property damage. If the at-fault driver nevertheless failed to maintain liability insurance, or if your claim exceeds the policy limits, you generally have two options:

  • Claim against the at-fault driver in his or her personal capacity and hope that he or she has enough resources to pay the claim; or
  • File a claim against your own insurance policy. Uninsured motorist insurance or underinsured motorist insurance is likely to cover your loss, although many Washington drivers do not carry this kind of insurance because no law requires it.

Of course, you might get lucky – if the driver was an on-duty employee of a company, you should be able to sue the company for damages.

Contact Us Today – Your Longview Personal Injury Attorneys

Call us today at 1-800-925-1875 or complete our online contact form to schedule your free initial consultation, so that we can discuss your case and advise you of your options.